Women Coaching Male Sports

Before I begin this article, I would like to start by congratulating Becky Hammon, Jen Welter, and Nancy Lieberman on being hired as coaches for their respective teams. Hammon, Welter and Lieberman have become the first three women to secure coaching positions with major men’s sports organizations. Now, the reason that I bring this up is because I’ve had some conversations recently about the topic of women coaching men’s sports, and I would like to give my opinion on the topic; in a more extensive form.

Now, my definition of what it takes to be a coach in any sport is experience; do you have experience in that particular sport? Have you played/coached in that particular sport professionally for a significant amount of time? When it comes to these three individuals, they all have just that, experience. They have each played professionally in their respective sports for numerous years, and have become students of the game during their tenures. I don’t understand how some people can say that there is a difference in the sports, and to be quite honest I only see two; the differences in their abilities (such as how alot more men can dunk than women), and the fact that one has men playing and the other has women playing. I mean if you can see another difference, please feel free to tweet me or leave it in the comments; but to me, plays are still plays, schemes are still schemes, no matter if it’s men running them or women running them.

Just think, the only two major differences between a female coach and a male coach is their gender (obviously), and the different plays/schemes that they run (which always comes with a new coach coming to an organization). I mean look at the great Pat Summitt for example; she is a woman, and she is considered one of the greatest college basketball coaches ever. She obviously knew what she was doing when she lead the University of Tennessee’s women’s basketball team to 8 titles, as well as a .841 winning percentage during her tenure as head coach. So, simply put, when it comes to coaching, it’s all about your knowledge of the game and not what your gender is.